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door

Fix a Warped Door

Doors made from badly seasoned timber are particularly prone to warping, though once you have corrected the warp it is unlikely to return. However, in some instances the warping is caused by outside factors – such as a radiator sited too close to the door, or bad ventilation. If you suspect that this is the case, take steps to deal with the external problems or the warp may recur.

If the warp is not too severe, there are several ways of forcing the door against the twist. Some of these, however, require the door to be kept shut and in many cases this is not convenient.

If you can keep the door shut, wedging it shut against the warp for a few days may well prove to be effective.

  1. To do this, look along the door to check the extent of the warp. Then, with the door just touching the doorstop, measure the gap between the door and stop at the widest point and cut a wooden block slightly larger than this gap.
  2. Fit the block at the point where the door and stop shut, so that it touches the stop at top and bottom. If leaving the door shut isn’t possible, you can either try altering the position of the hinge on the door frame to take up the twist (see diagram), or else alter the doorstop. How you do this depends on whether you have a stop which is a separate piece of wood nailed on (planted) or one cut out of the wood of the door frame itself (rebated). If you have a planted stop, close the door and cut a block of wood slightly larger than the widest gap.
  3. Run the block down the edge of the door marking the stop with a pencil.
  4. Prise the stop off. Loosen with an old chisel then pull away from the frame with your hands.
  5. Plane the stop then refit it flush with the door.

A rebated stop forms part of the door frame and can’t be removed. Instead you have to add a shaped piece to the stop to fill the gap.

To do this, measure the length of the gap between the door and stop. Then measure the width at the widest point.

Cut a wedge to these dimensions (see diagram) and nail it to the stop at the appropriate point. Once the wedge is in position, trim it again until you get a perfect fit.

The remedies above only work if the door has warped at the top or bottom corner. If it has warped in the centre you will have to cut a curved wedge tapered at both ends.

Internal Doors for the Winter Season

When you prepare for winter, if you don’t already have these items in place then you might want to consider it for heat retention in the home.

  • Insulation – roof insulation is easily obtainable. It is a soft thick type of spongy substance that is laid on the inside of the ceiling. This layer of insulation will contain the heat inside the home. If you think back to your school science days, you will remember that hot air rises. This hot air usually leaves through the ceiling and the roof. It also prevents the very cold air from entering the house through the roof and the ceiling. It has a double function in keeping your house warm.
  • Underfloor heating – this can only be used for certain floor surfaces such as under tiled floors. But check with the supplier if you decide on this option. Underfloor heating can only be considered if you are planning on revamping your floors. If you are retiling or putting in new floors then underfloor heating could be an option. This process has to be done before your floor tiles are laid.
  • Minimising open spaces – if you have rooms that don’t have doors, then you may want to consider adding internal doors. If there is no door leading to a particular room and you switch on the heater, the heat might easily escape through that open space. Think about installing an internal door in that room to contain the heat whenever you use a heater. You could opt for a modern internal door or standard option. It’s up to you. Seek the advice of a door supplier to guide you if you’re not sure about what will be best. It may also save energy because once it is warm you can switch the heater off and keep the heat in the room for a little bit longer.

These are three ways in which you can retain the heat in your home and keep your family warm during the winter months. While you do your research, look at energy saving methods so that you don’t spend too much on the heating bill this time.

Choosing Door Handles

Round, Rectangular, or Other: You are no longer limited to traditional round door knobs – oh no! Now, you can shop a wide selection of designer handles. Now days, you can choose long, slender rectangular door pulls or you can choose those wide, broad industrial looking door pulls or, yes, you can even still choose a traditional round door knob if you so desire but, place it in the center of your door hobbit-style. You can even choose curved, rather elegant gate pulls for your doors. It is all up to you!

If different shapes to choose from is not enough to show your true taste, you also have a choice of materials for your door handles – designer handles are available in stainless steel and bronze! If you want something more rustic and subtle, you might opt for bronze pull handles on your doors. If, on the other hand, you would rather have your home really stand out from the crowd, you might prefer stainless steel door handles that shine brightly and glisten in the sun. Again, it is all up to you!

And, as if all of those choices are not enough, both bronze handles and stainless steel door handles are available in a number of finishes for you to choose from. Both varieties are available in matte or gloss finishes. Stainless steel can be finished in a range of colors – white, black, gunmetal gray, and more. Bronze can be finished with varying levels of the golden coppery shade that bronze is known for. Both can be tooled so that they have wonderful texturing. Again, the choice is yours and, you might be pleasantly surprised at the variety of designer handles you have to choose from when you look.

Aesthetics aside, bronze door handles and stainless steel pull handles are remarkably strong and easy to care for. Because bronze and stainless steel are both alloys, they are incredibly strong – that means that they are hard to dent, ding, or scratch, no matter what you do to them. It also means that a soft dry cloth is the only equipment required to keep your designer handles nicely polished and glistening.

Removing Old Sliding Glass Door

First, you have to remove the sliding panel and the stationary panel. The vast majority of doors out there have the sliding panel on the inside half of the track, and the stationary panel is on the outside. Whatever the case in your particular door, the outside panel has to come out first. To remove the fixed panel, you need to remove the sill cap that snaps into the bottom track and runs from the fixed panel to the side jamb where the sliding panel locks. Force a screwdriver into the crease and pry the cap up. Then, look for screws on the inside side jamb holding the fixed panel in place. These screws prevent someone from prying up the sill cap and pulling out the fixed panel in order to gain entry into the home. In addition to the side jamb, be sure to check across the top header and bottom track for screws there as well. Once all the screws have been removed, you need to pull the fixed panel away from the side jamb. You can start by simply grabbing the side rail of the fixed panel and pulling as hard as you can. If you’re lucky, the panel will pop free. Then you can lift the panel up as far as it will go into the top channel and swing the bottom away from the track, and remove the panel.

Now, I said “if you’re lucky”, because in most cases the panel will be stuck in the side jamb, the bottom track, or both. Usually, you’re going to have to use a pry bar to loosen the fixed panel before it will slide out of the side jamb. Once the fixed panel is out, removal of the sliding panel is usually easier. Just lift up and swing the bottom away from the track, then remove the panel. Sometimes the bottom rollers will prevent the bottom from swinging out of the track. If that’s the case, you will need to find the roller adjustment hole in the bottom corners of the sliding panel. Put a screwdriver into this hole and turn the screw counterclockwise to bring the roller as far up into the bottom of the sliding panel as possible. This should allow the slider to come out.

Now, you want to remove all the screws from the side jambs, top header, and bottom track. Then, take a pry bar and get it under the bottom track about in the center. Pry up until the track is separated from the floor. The next step will depend on whether your old frame is nailed to the house frame, or simply screwed in. If it’s screwed in, then the frame should now be loose in the opening, since you removed all of the screws. You just need to remove whatever inside trim there might be around the door frame. This type of frame should come out. If your door is nailed to the house frame, you will have to do a bit more work. Use a hacksaw to cut the track in half, approximately in the center. Start with either half and raise the cut piece up towards the side jamb until the track piece separates from the side jamb. Do the same thing to the other half.

So, now you have to remove the side jambs. You want to do this without damaging the exterior material that surrounds the door frame. Take a heavy chisel and pound it into the crack between the frame and exterior material, whether it’s stucco, siding, etc. Start at the bottom 6 inches first. What you are trying to do is pull the nail fin away from the nails holding it in place. So, once the chisel is pounded through the metal frame, pry away from the side wall. The heavier and longer the chisel, the more leverage you will have. You will hear the frame “pop” free of the nail. There will be several nails holding each jamb in place, so you want to start at the bottom and work your way to the top corner. Once you get the bottom third loose, many times you can grab the jamb with both hands and pull the rest of the nails free as you go up. When you get to the top corner, work the jamb free. Do both jambs, then do the top. Sometimes the top has no nails, or just one in the center, so it will come down pretty easily. Be sure to wear safety glasses and a dust mask when doing this job, especially when removing the top header.